People, Places and Things

Potential Historic Resources for $200 Alec

Earlier this month the Santa Barbara Historic Landmarks Commission added 20 new properties to its list of potential historic landmarks and gave the axe to 5 that had already been named. Ever curious about what the powers that be deem worthy of distinction of becoming an Historic Resource, we set out to see these properties for ourselves. We we surprised by some and relieved by others. And so we share…

The properties, in no specific order are:

THE SMALLEST ON THE LIST: 117 West Mason Street – a studio built in 1931

THE BIGGEST ON THE LIST (or at least we think it is…): The Montecito Inn at 1295 Coast Village Road. It was built 1928 by Charlie Chaplin to serve the newly arriving motorists from near and far.

THE MOST HUMBLE ON THE LIST: We couldn’t decide so we awarded a tie to a vacant warehouse in the Funk Zone at 25 East Mason Street

And the sandstone Wall at 1130 North Milpas Street which is on vacant land owned by the County Bowl.

THE OLDEST ON THE LIST: Again, we aren’t certain, so two of the properties deserve this distinction. Our cursory internet research found that the home located at 653 Mission Canyon Road was built in 1914.

And “El Cerrito” at 2132 Mission Ridge Road (which is next door to Marymount School) was built in either 1913 or 1916. We believe it once was part of the Clarence A Black estate, most of which is present-day Marymount School.

MOST ICONIC ON THE LIST: Jimmy’s Oriental Garden – 126 East Canon Perdido Street. It was built in 1947.

THE TWO ON THE LIST THAT ARE NOW FOR SALE: 931 Las Alturas Road, which is a 1928 French villa called “Montjoie” (4 bedroom 6 baths + a guest house on 1.93 acres for a listing price of $7,995,000).

And a single family residence at 3626 San Remo Drive. Built in 1927 it has 4 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms on 1.3 acres and it’s for sale for $1,600,000.

UH FAVES ON THE LIST: The Joseph Knowles mural that for years was on the wall outside of the supermarket at the corner of Victoria and Chapala Streets (34 W. Victoria), and recently relocated to Chapala Street near Victoria. Our Marvelous Mid- Century Mosaics story shows some great early photos of that gem and tells some of its history.

And the water tower at 1914 Santa Barbara Street. We aren’t sure of the date of construction, but would sure love to know it.

APARTMENT BUILDINGS…OR SOON TO BE APARTMENT BUILDINGS: 25 Arlington Avenue and its 25 units.

125 West Anapamu Street, which is a really sweet building that often goes unnoticed on that busy part of Anapamu Street.

“Hillside House” at 1235 Veronica Springs Road. Annexed into the City in 2004, this property has for years been the home of a non profit program for developmentally disabled people. In 2011 plans were approved to turn this historic house into a triplex .

QUINTESSENTIAL SANTA BARBARA OFFICE SPACE – 223 East De La Guerra Street, currently the home of Sonos.

LOVELY 1920’s ABODES: 117 Rametto Road, which was built in 1924. Does anyone know if this was originally part of the Billings estate?

And 1555 Alameda Padre Serra , which rounds the corner onto Arguello Road. This home was built in 1921. We sure wish we could see more of it, but alas, like so many other wonderful local properties the hedges are so overgrown that only a peek of the architecture is visible.

A FEW PROPERTIES WE KNOW ALMOST NOTHING ABOUT: 1801 Las Tunas Road. We hear it was built in 1940.

14 West Micheltorena Street.

2127 De La Vina. The guy on the roof with his phone and a magazine was a pleasant surprise.

And here are the five properties that lost their spot on the “potential list”…In no particular order, they are:

A VACANT LOT: This property is located at 529 West Junipero Street.

THE BRAILLE INSTITUTE: 2031 De La Vina Street.

AN OLD FARM HOUSE: 1822 De La Vina Street.

A HOUSE: 1921 Bath Street.

And now, please forgive the commentary but we just can’t seem to help ourselves on this one… It seems that the management at the historic Lobero Theater is suggesting the olive trees out front are diseased beyond saving. They therefore want to chop these ancient beauties down and replace them with trees that are incompatible with the original Lockwood de Forrest landscaping design. We believe that in some instances (like when George Washington Smith and Lockwood de Forrest are collaborating) they sometimes get it right the first time.

Earlier this month the Santa Barbara Historic Landmarks Commission added 20 new properties to its list of potential historic landmarks and gave the axe to 5 that had already been named. Ever curious about what the powers that be deem worthy of distinction of becoming an Historic Resource, we set out to see these properties for ourselves. We we surprised by some and relieved by others. And so we share…

The properties, in no specific order are:

THE SMALLEST ON THE LIST: 117 West Mason Street – a studio built in 1931

THE BIGGEST ON THE LIST (or at lest we think it is…): The Montecito Inn at 1295 Coast Village Road. It was built 1928 by Charlie Chaplin to serve the newly arriving motorists from near and far.

THE MOST HUMBLE ON THE LIST: We couldn’t decide so we awarded a tie to a vacant warehouse in the Funk Zone at 25 East Mason Street

And the sandstone Wall at 1130 North Milpas Street which is on vacant land owned by the County Bowl.

THE OLDEST ON THE LIST: Again, we aren’t certain, so two of the properties deserve this distinction. Our cursory internet research found that the home located at 653 Mission Canyon Road was built in 1914.

And “El Cerrito” at 2132 Mission Ridge Road (which is next door to Marymount School) was built in either 1913 or 1916. We believe it once once part of the Clarence A Black estate, most of which is present-day Marymount School.

MOST ICONIC ON THE LIST: Jimmy’s Oriental Garden – 126 East Canon Perdido Street. It was built in 1947.

THE TWO ON THE LIST THAT ARE NOW FOR SALE: 931 Las Alturas Road, which is a 1928 French villa called “Montjoie” (4 bedroom 6 baths + a guest house on 1.93 acres for a listing price of $7,995,000).

And a single family residence at 3626 San Remo Drive. Built in 1927 it has 4 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms on 1.3 acres and it’s for sale for $1,600,000.

UH FAVES ON THE LIST: The Joseph Knowles mural that for years was on the wall outside of the supermarket at the corner of Victoria and Chapala Streets (34 W. Victoria), and recently relocated to Chapala Street near Victoria. Our Marvelous Mid- Century Mosaics story shows some great early photos of that gem and tells some of its history.

And the water tower at 1914 Santa Barbara Street. We aren’t sure of the date of construction, but would sure love to know it.

APARTMENT BUILDINGS…OR SOON TO BE APARTMENT BUILDINGS: 25 Arlington Avenue and its 25 units.

125 West Anapamu Street, which is a really sweet building that often goes unnoticed on that busy part of Anapamu Street.

“Hillside House” at 1235 Veronica Springs Road. Annexed into the City in 2004, this property has for years been the home of a non profit program for developmentally disabled people. In 2011 plans were approved to turn this historic house into a triplex .

QUINTESSENTIAL SANTA BARBARA OFFICE SPACE – 223 East De La Guerra Street, currently the home of Sonos.

LOVELY 1920’s ABODES: 117 Rametto Road, which was built in 1924. Does anyone know if this was originally part of the Billings estate?

And 1555 Alameda Padre Serra , which rounds the corner onto Arguello Road. This home was built in 1921. We sure wish we could see more of it, but alas, like so many other wonderful local properties the hedges are so overgrown that only a peek of the architecture is visible.

A FEW PROPERTIES WE KNOW ALMOST NOTHING ABOUT: 1801 Las Tunas Road. We hear it was built in 1940.

14 West Micheltorena Street.

2127 De La Vina. The guy on the roof with his phone and a magazine was a pleasant surprise.

And here are the five properties that lost their spot on the “potential list”…In no particular order, they are:

A VACANT LOT: This property is located at 529 West Junipero Street.

THE BRAILLE INSTITUTE: 2031 De La Vina Street.

AN OLD FARM HOUSE: 1822 De La Vina Street.

A HOUSE: 1921 Bath Street.

And now, please forgive the commentary but we just can’t seem to help ourselves on this one… It seems that the management at the historic Lobero Theater is suggesting the olive trees out front are diseased beyond saving. They therefore want to chop these ancient beauties down and replace them with trees that are incompatible with the original Lockwood de Forrest landscaping design. We believe that in some instances (like when George Washington Smith and Lockwood de Forrest are collaborating) they sometimes get it right the first time.

As always, we encourage you to go out and explore the neighborhoods, keep your eyes, ears and minds open to all that you encounter, and above all expect the unexpected.

As always, we encourage you to go out and explore the neighborhoods, keep your eyes, ears and minds open to all that you encounter, and above all expect the unexpected.

About Peter Hartmann and Stacey Wright

We are two "fifty-something" year olds who are lifetime residents of Santa Barbara. Together, we have decided to walk each and every street within the City limits of Santa Barbara just for the fun of it. Peter is a dentist, and Stacey is a long-time County employee who helps the elderly without family to look after them. Read more

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