People, Places and Things Archive

  • While every proud Santa Barbaran knows that our town is full of a lot of firsts, (the first Egg Mc Muffin, the first Sambo’s, the first hydraulic brakes (whatt???), the first taste of Hidden Valley Ranch Dressing, the first Decker’s flip flops…) many people are probably unaware that our community also produced the first (and to date only) Hispanic Governor of American California. His name was Romualdo Pacheco. This is his official State portrait. Born Jose Antonio Romualdo Pacheco Jr. on October 31, 1831, most likely at the Santa Barbara Presidio, he was the second son of Captain Jose […] 0

    The (805) to the (808)

    While every proud Santa Barbaran knows that our town is full of a lot of firsts, (the first Egg Mc Muffin, the first Sambo’s, the first hydraulic brakes (whatt???), the first taste of Hidden Valley Ranch Dressing, the first Decker’s flip flops…) many people are probably unaware that our community also produced the first (and to date only) Hispanic Governor of American California. His name was Romualdo Pacheco. This is his official State portrait. Born Jose Antonio Romualdo Pacheco Jr. on October 31, 1831, most likely at the Santa Barbara Presidio, he was the second son of Captain Jose […]

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  • As we continue on our systematic trek through Montecito, we recently passed through what local real estate agents refer to as the “Hedgerow District”, or some similar designation. We’ve always known of the Hedgerows in Montecito, and even spent quite a bit of time wandering around in them in decades past; but until now we never cared too much about where they begin and where they end. Some will probably take issue with our boundaries, but we feel like the Hedgerows now comprise the area shown in this map – the north/south borders are Mimosa Lane and No. Jameson; […] 0

    Is There a Bustle in Your Hedgerow?

    As we continue on our systematic trek through Montecito, we recently passed through what local real estate agents refer to as the “Hedgerow District”, or some similar designation. We’ve always known of the Hedgerows in Montecito, and even spent quite a bit of time wandering around in them in decades past; but until now we never cared too much about where they begin and where they end. Some will probably take issue with our boundaries, but we feel like the Hedgerows now comprise the area shown in this map – the north/south borders are Mimosa Lane and No. Jameson; […]

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  • While wandering the streets of Montecito last week we came upon a relic we’ve whizzed by in our cars hundreds of times over that past decades. It’s located off of Hot Springs Road between Pepper Lane and School House Road, but closer to Pepper Lane. Walking along with little more to do than observe and wonder, the old leaning water tower took on a beauty we’d never before known her to possess. For one thing she looked more fragile than ever, leaning much more than we’d previously noticed. We also appreciated her humble appearance and her obvious historical significance. […] 0

    The Leaning Tower of Montecito

    While wandering the streets of Montecito last week we came upon a relic we’ve whizzed by in our cars hundreds of times over that past decades. It’s located off of Hot Springs Road between Pepper Lane and School House Road, but closer to Pepper Lane. Walking along with little more to do than observe and wonder, the old leaning water tower took on a beauty we’d never before known her to possess. For one thing she looked more fragile than ever, leaning much more than we’d previously noticed. We also appreciated her humble appearance and her obvious historical significance. […]

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  • With Earth Day celebrations in full gear in our backyard, we decided to head to a quieter hike zone in Montecito. Originally we had planned to hike a few of the streets, in our quest to walk every street in Montecito. But soon we discovered that much of the most delightful hiking in Montecito is found along trails that intersect the public roadways. We started by exploring the Hedgerows, and soon wound up on San Leandro Lane, which happens to be the old stompin’ grounds for the UH back in the late 1960’s and 70’s. And so, we happily […] 0

    88 Acres – Or is it 80 Acres?

    With Earth Day celebrations in full gear in our backyard, we decided to head to a quieter hike zone in Montecito. Originally we had planned to hike a few of the streets, in our quest to walk every street in Montecito. But soon we discovered that much of the most delightful hiking in Montecito is found along trails that intersect the public roadways. We started by exploring the Hedgerows, and soon wound up on San Leandro Lane, which happens to be the old stompin’ grounds for the UH back in the late 1960’s and 70’s. And so, we happily […]

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  • The Urban Hikers checked out City properties recently deemed worthy of being added to the City's Potential Historic Resources List, as well as those that got the axe. 0

    Potential Historic Resources for $200 Alec

    The Urban Hikers checked out City properties recently deemed worthy of being added to the City's Potential Historic Resources List, as well as those that got the axe.

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  • Over the years we’ve heard stories about the day a snowstorm hit Santa Barbara, but until recently we’d never spoken to anyone with a first hand account. Last week while talking with a SB native and Edhat subscriber, we got the scoop and dates of the storm. This made our research pretty simple. But we have only been able to round-up a few images of the snowstorm of 1949, all of which were published in the Santa Barbara News-Press. We are certain that other photos exist in old photo albums or on the walls of homes throughout town, and […] 0

    Snow in Santa Barbara

    Over the years we’ve heard stories about the day a snowstorm hit Santa Barbara, but until recently we’d never spoken to anyone with a first hand account. Last week while talking with a SB native and Edhat subscriber, we got the scoop and dates of the storm. This made our research pretty simple. But we have only been able to round-up a few images of the snowstorm of 1949, all of which were published in the Santa Barbara News-Press. We are certain that other photos exist in old photo albums or on the walls of homes throughout town, and […]

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  • By now most of us know that the “Chromatic Gate” (love it or hate it) is under restoration. The “Chromatic Gate” is the massive rainbow sculpture that sits at the bottom of Calle Puerta Villarta, just across the street from Fess Parker’s Doubletree Resort. What you may not know is that the creator of that sculpture, Herbert Bayer, was a true Renaissance man, a member of our community and a highly regarded international artist. True, his “Chromatic Gate” may not be the most popular of his creations, but we are lucky to have it, and even luckier that some […] 0

    Typographer, Artist, Sculptor, Man

    By now most of us know that the “Chromatic Gate” (love it or hate it) is under restoration. The “Chromatic Gate” is the massive rainbow sculpture that sits at the bottom of Calle Puerta Villarta, just across the street from Fess Parker’s Doubletree Resort. What you may not know is that the creator of that sculpture, Herbert Bayer, was a true Renaissance man, a member of our community and a highly regarded international artist. True, his “Chromatic Gate” may not be the most popular of his creations, but we are lucky to have it, and even luckier that some […]

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  • The earliest days in the City of Santa Barbara saw three distinct architectural styles: huts of the Native Americans, adobes with red tile roofs and wooden structures, which many of the newest settlers preferred due to their economy and tradition. Prior to 1872 when Stearn’s Wharf was operational, most cargo arriving in Santa Barbara was simply off- loaded beyond the waves and allowed to float ashore. This included lumber for many of Santa Barbara’s first wooden structures. In fact, when attempting to estimate the age of an old buildings in Santa Barbara, many take into consideration the width of […] 0

    Victorian Cribs of the Upper East

    The earliest days in the City of Santa Barbara saw three distinct architectural styles: huts of the Native Americans, adobes with red tile roofs and wooden structures, which many of the newest settlers preferred due to their economy and tradition. Prior to 1872 when Stearn’s Wharf was operational, most cargo arriving in Santa Barbara was simply off- loaded beyond the waves and allowed to float ashore. This included lumber for many of Santa Barbara’s first wooden structures. In fact, when attempting to estimate the age of an old buildings in Santa Barbara, many take into consideration the width of […]

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  • Once upon a time, a little girl named Anna Dorinda Blaksley was born in St. Louis Missouri. Although she started life more than 2,000 miles from Santa Barbara, years before the advent of cars and airplanes, her life and legacy have left a lasting impression on this community and the people who have since lived here. Anna Dorinda Bliss is well loved for her philanthropy of both Cottage Hospital and the Botanic Gardens, but she is best-known as the creator and mastermind of Casa Dorinda, a magnificent estate known for its extravagance and grander. After serving as home to […] 0

    Casa Dorinda – Montecito’s Downton Abbey II

    Once upon a time, a little girl named Anna Dorinda Blaksley was born in St. Louis Missouri. Although she started life more than 2,000 miles from Santa Barbara, years before the advent of cars and airplanes, her life and legacy have left a lasting impression on this community and the people who have since lived here. Anna Dorinda Bliss is well loved for her philanthropy of both Cottage Hospital and the Botanic Gardens, but she is best-known as the creator and mastermind of Casa Dorinda, a magnificent estate known for its extravagance and grander. After serving as home to […]

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  • Last week we took you on a tour of the Bliss estate known as Casa Dorinda, now operating as as senior living community. We also promised to tell you more this week about the history of the estate and the many people whose lives were intertwined with it. But, alas we are still in the process of discovering information and possibly old photographs for our story. So, we’re switching gears a bit and will share with you what we’ve learned about the herd of goats that regularly clear parts of the property of its “fire fuel” in order to […] 0

    Goats & Their Protector

    Last week we took you on a tour of the Bliss estate known as Casa Dorinda, now operating as as senior living community. We also promised to tell you more this week about the history of the estate and the many people whose lives were intertwined with it. But, alas we are still in the process of discovering information and possibly old photographs for our story. So, we’re switching gears a bit and will share with you what we’ve learned about the herd of goats that regularly clear parts of the property of its “fire fuel” in order to […]

    Continue Reading